Thursday, November 17, 2011

Another One for the Till




Finished this panel saw shortly after finishing the 19" tenon saw. Thought I'd just do a short post with a few pictures. This one has a 22" saw plate, .032 thick, filed rip at 8 ppi. Rake angle of about 5* relaxed. No fleam on this one. The handle is beech. I filed the first 2" at the toe at 12 ppi in hope that this would make it easier to start. I think in theory it was a good idea, but I should've filed it this way for maybe the first 4" or so. The 2" just isn't enough to really get it started, at least not in my few test cuts I made. Built this one for when I want a cleaner cut in 3/4" stuff than what my D-8 5ppi could give me, and for rips in stuff thinner than 3/4 stock. Again, all I've done is a few test rips in 3/4 pine, but so far so good.

9 comments:

Ryan said...

Jamie, these saws are gorgeous! You do some very nice work. I have rehandled and reconditioned some saws, and made a few planes so I've officially caught the tool-making bug. But I can't find saw blanks anywhere. Where do you get yours from?

baconj said...

Thanks Ryan! I'm glad you like the saws. Tool-making is a bug for sure. But one I'm not looking to cure. :) I'm really enjoying it.
As for the saw blanks, if you're referring to the saw plate itself, I just order 1095 blue-tempered spring steel shim stock from McMaster-Carr. They have all different thicknesses and sizes available. So far, I've used .018, .025, and .032. The blue is easily removed by about a 60 second soak in a citric acid solution.
I'd really like to make some planes soon. I have a few blanks of quarter-sawn black birch that I got with intentions of making a miter plane and a couple rabbet planes. What kind of planes have you made?

Ryan said...

Nice! Black birch is awesome to work with (although a bit fragile, so it can be tricky). I've made a try plane(western red maple), a couple of James Krenov smoothers (jatoba) and a drawer bottom plane (birch and quartersawn hickory for the skate). The Krenov smoothers work alright, but I still prefer my LN 4 1/2. The try plane is a daily user in my shop though. At 32" it can pretty much true up anything...

Joe said...

Wow, they look great. There is no satisfaction like building a project with tools you have also built. I was wondering about your plate material though. Aren't handsaws and panel saws typically taper ground? Have you found the plate to bind in a rip teeth without that taper? Just curious how that is working for you.

Thank
Joe

baconj said...

Ryan,
A 32" try plane. That's impressive. I bet that WILL true just about anything you want it to. I have an old 30" single iron Kellogg that is one of my favorites.

baconj said...

Hi Joe. Glad you like the saws. Yes, many hand saws and panel saws ARE taper ground. I know that some if not all of Mike Wenzloff's hand and panel saws are taper ground, but the ones he sells as a kit are not. Lie-Nielsen says on their site that theirs are as well. There is no mention on their web site of Medallion saws being taper ground. (They are beautiful saws by the way.) When Adam Cherubini was making saws for sale, his hand and panel saws were not taper ground.
There is some debate over the merits of taper grinding. The following link turned into a pretty good debate, some of which was about taper grinding.
I for one have found no issue with either my crosscut panel or rip filed panel not being taper ground. In fact, I like the extra weight that it gives the saw. No problem with binding in the kerf at all. I do keep all my saws waxed. I find this aids greatly with all saws. Hope this long winded answer didn't wander too far from your question.

http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=&Number=5392051&page=&view=&sb=5&o=&fpart=all&vc=1

P.S. I am a saw making novice and stake no claim to knowing all the ins and outs of saw making. At least not at this point. :) It IS interesting though.

Chris G. said...

Hi Jaime,

I see you have the toolmaking bug too. I seem to spend more time making tools than furniture. I like your paint can forge. I am ready to make the jump from MAPP gas on bricks myself. Thanks for blogging!

Chris

baconj said...

Glad you enjoy the blog Chris. The paint can forge works GREAT. I highly recommend it.

Kari Hultman said...

Jamie, you'll be hanging up your sawmaker sign before too long! Beautiful work, as always.